Mutterings and utterings of a budding novelist

Catching a Break

Today Amazon.co.uk has reported that they have sold more copies of E.L. James’ astoundingly erotic novel Fifty Shades of Grey than the entire library of Harry Potter books combined, making her their best-selling author ever.

No whilst I may screw my face up at the very notion of the book (to me it’s simply the premise to a porn movie), you can’t help but applaud James on managing to break open the barrier between traditionally published and self-published books. In fact she’s blown it wide open. Most critics will turn their nose up at any self-published book, deeming it inferior to one that has taken its journey through a well-established publisher. But does that mean it isn’t what the general public want to read?

To me the world of novel-writing has taken a bizarre turn in the past decade. Whilst it has always been difficult to get published, even more so now with the world’s economy, publishers have always looked upon each submission with such enormous criticism that they could only read the first page of an author’s prized work before uttering ‘Meh!’ and casting it into a rapidly filling bin.

Now this could dash the dreams of the less-determined writer, but the invention of e-books and e-book readers has allowed rejected authors a fresh chance to show their literature to the world. Of course this has its downsides – the market has become rapidly pumped full of stories that look like the reluctantly penned homework of a ten year old. And not only this, but the choice of books on sites like e-bay has become so vast that each author once again has little chance of getting their work to an audience.

It’s almost like being in a stadium filled to the brim with people all singing as loud as they can, in the hope somebody will recognise their talent above the rest.

 

So how did E.L. James manage to do so well?

Well since the book began as fan fiction for Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight saga, it already recieved a bit of attention. It’s overly erotic themes received a few raised eyebrows on the site she posted it, and thus it was removed.

She placed the book on her own blog before again removing it to sell it in e-book andΒ  print-on-demand paperback versions.

Then through the use of blogs and word-of-mouth she managed to get the message out. And suddenly the demand poured in.

For the rest of us authors though, with books that are tamer and less scandalous, trying to follow in James’ isn’t quite as easy. Even for those with novels of similar tones, the road to success may have been built, but it’s now crammed with traffic as copycat novels spring up.

I guess there’s no true way to find the big break. But I do feel there are things you can do to help. We’ve all heard the saying – ‘It’s not what you know, but who you know.’ I feel there is no truer statement. Which is why it pays to be polite and respectful. Whilst working as a barman years ago, I did my best to be friendly to every single person I served, no matter how disrespectful they were to me. I can truly say that this paid off. Not only did it lead me to my friend and business partner Bev, and my girlfriend Wendy, but it has also brought numerous friends and acquaitences in all professions on whom I can call on for help.

Stopping to help someone get their car started? Who knows if that person is an artist who will design you a book cover in the future?

Helping an old lady with her shopping? Who knows if that lady’s daughter is a marketing consultant that could be a great contact in the future?

Which is why I feel a true, genuine and decent etiquette must always be employed both online and offline. There should be no ego-strutting, no borderline narcissistic personality disorders, and certainly no angry retaliation when somebody takes the time to critique your work. After all, we are all trying to sell our work to ‘people’. Why shouldn’t we treat ‘people’ with decency in order to encourage help and sales.

 

I’ve just finished Richard Branson’s autobiography and one incident has stuck with me.

When Branson was in his twenties and struggling to build Virgin Records as a successful record company, he found he could escape certain taxes by falsely declaring purchased records were to be sold abroad. So with filled vans he would take records to Calais, get a stamp to show the stock was being transported abroad, then turn around and sell them in England. Of course authorities soon caught on to this, and in the dead of the night Branson recieved a telephone call from an unknown man who tipped him off about a coming raid on Branson’s shops and warehouses, telling him to shine a blacklight over all his records and hide the ones marked ‘A’. When asked why the man was helping him, he solemnly replied that Branson had spent hours preventing one of his friends from committing suicide years early when the future billionaire manned a phoneline helping troubled teenagers.
Whilst of course I don’t advocate evading tax, this story just goes to show that good deeds can and do eventually catch up with you. Who knows, the next time you retrieve a lost wallet for someone, it could be a very grateful Stephen King. πŸ™‚

Success!

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2 responses

  1. Interesting as ever. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. The kindness you display to (effectively) strangers is a refreshing gust of wind in an otherwise stagnant world.
    Don’t ever change that!

    With E.L James, I discussed the success of the books yesterday with my office (a room full of detectives specialising in domestic and sexual abuse!) and we decided that the general readership can be crudely broken in to 2 groups. 1), the unintellectual that read the 50 shades trilogy for the sex (which is frankly, a bit boring) and 2), those that read for the underlying story.
    Hidden under the “inner goddess” “subscious” and “holy craps” (the books aren’t that well written) is an interesting (but basic) story of abuse, trust, building relationships and love. Ok, unfortunately it was initially Twilight fanfic, and the story is too cliched to ever win any literary prizes … but they aren’t as bad as people make out.

    I, like you, will never begrudge the author her success. Those writers that do are full of bitterness.

    Continue reaching upwards!

    August 1, 2012 at 12:23 pm

  2. Aw thanks mate! That means a lot πŸ™‚

    As for Fifty Shades, I’ve agreed to read it to give it my unbiased opinion. It really goes to show though that ‘word of mouth’ can be the best advertisement.
    I applaud E.L. without a doubt. Not only has she’s done something that most of us can only dream of, but shown us that this dream can become a reality πŸ˜€

    Onwards and upwards my friend πŸ™‚

    August 5, 2012 at 11:31 pm

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